Juan Atkins

Juan Atkins: The Man-Soulmachine
Machine Soul Innovator

Not much to add to what I said here, but within the context of what we've got lined up in the August heat, it seemed high time to throw a little more love Magic Juan's way. Of course the Deep Space LP is machine soul's stone tablet, and early records like No UFO's and Night Drive were the crucial bridge between the electro space jams of the early 80s and the sleek austerity of 90s techno, but there's an awful lot going on in the spaces within the spaces that merits further investigation...

Juan Atkins Future Sound EP Underground Level

Take a record like The Future Sound EP (released under his own name), an utter one off on Underground Level Recordings that finds Juan Atkins gathering together a selection of tracks from Martin Bonds and Mike Huckaby (alongside his own track Interpret) that showcase the brittle Motor City sound of his Interface imprint, splitting the difference between the sleek futurism of the People Mover and the tactile reality of the freeway underpass. A track like Urban Tropics seems poised between the early Metroplex records and where Atkins would take things into the 90s.

Infiniti The Infiniti Collection Tresor

This 90s sound came to be embodied in the Infiniti records and Atkins' fruitful collaborations with Basic Channel's Moritz von Oswald (see also Deep Space and their more recent Borderland records). Tunes like Flash Flood and Skyway set their sights on the infinite horizon, achieving trance states with an aerodynamic precision, while Never Tempt Me squared the circle between Atkins' micro-house innovations and his machine soul foundations.

Model 500 Mind And Body R&S

Appropriately, the latter was explored to its fullest on 90s Model 500 records like The Flow, I Wanna Be There and large swathes of the Mind And Body album 1998. Tracks like Tipsy, Be Brave and Just Maybe ran parallel to Timbaland and The Neptunes' own post-Deep Space innovations, aligning itself with chrome-plated r&b futurism (with strong undercurrents of drum 'n bass) at the turn of the millennium. Of course, he'd already begun flirting with such sounds in 1989 with Visions' Other Side Of Life, a house-inflected machine soul hybrid shot through with Atkins' trademark synth mirage.

Juan Atkins, wearing headphones, looks on

Indeed, one of Atkins' greatest gifts is his way with a synth, coaxing these great multi-faceted prisms of texture from his machines that sound like nothing so much as rays of light streaming through a raincloud. Infiniti's Impulse, Model 500's The Passage and Incredible all showcase that sound from various angles (and within strikingly different contexts). I've often thought that Timbaland's production for Aaliyah's Rock The Boat bore a striking resemblance to Atkins' synth architecture.


So beyond the obvious currents of innovation and influence that spread through dance and street music in the intervening years, it's fascinating to return to the man's music and hear the blueprints for the future, drawn up far in advance. In truth, it seems that even with the passage of time, decades in fact, we're all still catching up...

Mýa The Moonlight

Mýa live @ the Music Box 8/2/2018

These are just a few scenes from Mýa's concert last Thursday, an evening of contemporary r&b music. I'm on record about the machine soul genius of It's All About Me, with its space capsule Art Of Noise loops and that atmospheric bridge in lunar orbit (a SA-RA-before-SA-RA moment), and Moodring remains a classic from the peak era of the form, so it was a treat to catch her live at the Music Box backed by current producer MyGuyMars and DJ Klash.

MyGuyMars works the machines

The show had the feel of an old-time soul revue, with the trio working through Mýa's songbook as an arcing medley stretching across the length of the evening. Firm favorites like Movin' On,1 Case Of The Ex and Fallen rubbed shoulders with new material like Simple Things and The Fall. She even opened with a cover of Sade's No Ordinary Love,2 which makes perfect sense in the context of ambient dreamscapes like It's All About Me (which — thankfully — she also managed to touch upon as well).

Mýa hands out the roses

There was also a preview of a new track sounding like slow-motion trance music that — strangely enough — reminded me of certain tunes from DJ Bongz' South African house mixes like No Retreat. No Surrender. Mýa also had plenty of chances to showcase her dance moves and even spit some bars on Unbreakable. At one point, she handed out roses to people in the audience and distributed glasses of wine(!) to the front row while the new Terry Hunter Circle Club Mix of Circle Of Life3 played over the P.A.

Mýa Circle Of Life Planet 9

From what I've heard so far, the new record T.K.O. (which was produced by MyGuyMars) sounds awfully intriguing. After some searching, it appears that the CD can be procured from her website.4 With her own Planet 9 Records set up, and even the general feel of the site (which isn't a million miles removed from that of Mahogani Music),5 it's rather evocative of an independent modern soul, city lights endeavor.

R&B's girl-next-door still going strong, twenty years on...

Footnotes

1.

When she reached the lyric you know I wear a size 4, she quipped It ain't a 4 no more!

2.

Apparently, Sade is listed among Mýa's key influences. Funny enough, just the other day I was commenting that It's All About Me had the feel of a Sade song. Plus, Sade's Surrender Your Love just featured as July's record of the month). Sometimes these things just come together...

3.

The single also features remixes from Mike Dunn (Chicago bizzness in full effect).

4.

Mýa. Mýa, Planet 9, 1998. http://www.myamya.com/. Accessed 5 Aug. 2018.

5.

Mahogani Music. Mahogani Music, 2004. http://www.mahoganimusic.com/. Accessed 5 Aug. 2018.