Manu Dibango

Manu Dibango: Superfly ambassador of the funky Soul Makossa Belonging to the continuum of storied ambassadors of African music alongside the likes of Babatunde Olatunji, Hugh Masekela and Fela Kuti, saxophonist Hugh Masekela was one of the original leading lights of the continent to break out into the wider world of pop music. Making a … Continue reading Manu Dibango

Luscious Jackson

In the space between its Native Tongues-initiated Daisy Age and the creeping dread of the Wu-Tang era lie hip hop's endlessly fertile mid-period, a time when Diamond D's Digging In The Crates ethos, The Low End Theory and the rolling g-funk of Dr. Dre's The Chronic were the order of the day, taking the sound … Continue reading Luscious Jackson

Model 500 – Deep Space

Model 500 Deep Space R&S 1995 It's time to talk about Deep Space. An album dropped by Juan Atkins amidst a flurry of activity in 1995, it was released smack in the middle of the nineties and bisecting the decade both literally and metaphorically. Slotting in quite comfortably within the currents of outer space imagery … Continue reading Model 500 – Deep Space

Terminal Vibration II

Remain In Ghosts Two years ago I asked the question Where does machine funk intersect with post punk? It's a question I'd meant to jump into deeper at the time, but then the moment seemed to pass. I'd been toying with the notion of revisiting it recently, weaving a narrative around these two strands of … Continue reading Terminal Vibration II

Fall Inna Bassbin

During what's turned out to be an exceptionally busy week, I've been vibing out practically non-stop to Woebot's latest mix: Bands a make her dance.1 The mix's general brief is rapping with instruments inna live band stylee — stretching back through time all the way to the fifties — and it's an absolute burner, packed with incredible music spanning … Continue reading Fall Inna Bassbin

Deep Space 100

Prepare to take a trip Space. The vastness of which we cannot even begin to comprehend. The crew of the Apollo 13 mission traveled farther into it than any human ever has — 248,655 miles — during their improvised orbit of the moon. By way of comparison, the Milky Way galaxy is 100,000 light years across... that's 600,000,000,000,000,000 miles! … Continue reading Deep Space 100