Terminal Vibration II

Two years ago I asked the question Where does machine funk intersect with post punk? It's a question I'd meant to jump into deeper at the time, but then the moment seemed to pass. I'd been toying with the notion of revisiting it recently, weaving a narrative around these two strands of music that seemed to run in tandem for much of the eighties (and beyond, truth be told). Just the other day, my brother Matt was over and we were listening to a selection of music that in large part sprang from this continuum and he commented on the striking sonic overlap between post punk, disco and funk, that the three genres almost formed the sides of a triangle that - and I'm jumping in here - had a profound shaping influence on modern music.

The tune that instigated the comment was Jermaine Jackson's Erucu, playing out on the heels of a bunch of late-period post punk along the lines of A Certain Ratio and 23 Skidoo, but something like Barry Waite & Ltd.'s Sting or James Brown's I Can't Stand It "76" would make the case just as strongly. That is, the stripped-down tautness of funk, aspects of disco's four to the floor minimalism and the funky edge of post punk's year zero reinvention of the rhythmic wheel (sourced in large part in the very no-nonsense funk of the seventies in question here) share a certain sonic kinship that (teasing in reggae here as well) seems to have laid out the next decade(s) in advance.

Wheeling this back to my original comment about post punk vis a vis machine funk, what you had in the eighties was this great convergence between the two worlds, almost as if two dimensions overlapped for this blessed spell of time and characters were able to move freely between the two worlds in a great exchange of ideas. I'm talking about Bernie Worrell joining the Talking Heads on tour, Blondie's Chris Stein providing those moody dubplates for Wildstyle, New Order hooking up with Arthur Baker and John Robie in New York for Confusion, and about a thousand other examples.

Speaking of Baker/Robie (the producers of Afrika Bambaataa & Soulsonic Force's Planet Rock), the picture really falls into place when you take things like electro and early hip hop into consideration. On one hand, you have the spectral missives of Hashim (whose Primrose Path sounds like the digital cousin of 400 Blows' Declaration Of Intent, both sharing in those same slap-bass future shock vibes) and Man Parrish's Special Disconet Remix of Hip Hop, Be Bop (Don't Stop) (whose rubberband bassline seems to recall The Clash's The Magnificent Seven (whose bassline seems to recall Chic's Good Times (whose bassline was seemingly imitated by everybody else as well))), while on the other you have The Cold Crush Brothers' Punk Rock Rap and Grandmaster Flash & The Furious Five's New York New York. All of which could theoretically soundtrack a rough-and-tumble cinematic take on William Gibson's Neuromancer. Of course, it doesn't stop there...

Take Prince and his affinity with not only new wave but also PIL, whose Metal Box is one of the cornerstones of post punk; if the genre does indeed have a pantheon, then it's right in there at the top. Interestingly, along with dub and funk, PIL were deeply shaped by Can's krautrock/funk, whose Ege Bamyasi and Saw Delight slide right in this continuum without much fuss at all.1

Once krautrock enters the discussion, the elephant in the room is obviously Brian Eno, who - along with David Bowie - were one of the main conduits of the music into the post punk collective consciousness (and beyond). Indeed, Bowie jumping from the plastic soul of Young Americans into the Autobahn-surfing Europe-endlessness of Station To Station and on into the Berlin trilogy - where the aerodynamic funk of those two records gets yoked to an electronic framework that is firmly in this continuum (see Breaking Glass, Blackout and D.J. for starters).

And Eno of course went on to become the crucial guiding force in not only the Talking Heads' post punk trilogy (particularily Remain In Light) but also the tremendously prescient My Life In The Bush Of Ghosts. Both of which are defining records in this post punk/machine funk district, and lie at the heart of what I will call my idea of the eighties. You can hear the overlap between the rolling rhythms of these two strikingly modern records and - on the one hand - West African monster jams like Tony Allen's N.E.P.A (Never Expect Power Always) and - on the other hand, perhaps more unexpectedly - early rap excursions like Spoonie Gee's Spoonin' Rap, with all four records sharing that same sense of thick atmosphere rising like vapors from the twilight city streets.

We will hang out in this neighborhood for awhile, so don't go anywhere, but I must leave you for a moment to score some alcapurrias from this bodega on the corner. Chill here on this bench for awhile and listen to Remain In Light and My Life In The Bush Of Ghosts back to back while watching the traffic, and I'll be back in a bit.

To be continued...

1. Indeed, I've always thought that the often-derided late-period Can records like Flow Motion, Saw Delight and Can only suffer by comparison to the band's seismic earlier material; taken on their own merits, I think they stack up quite favourably as shadowy precursors to things like Fear Of Music, Remain In Light and My Life In The Bush Of Ghosts. Just because something isn't Halleluwah doesn't mean it's worthless! So don't sleep...


TV2 Remain In Ghosts

  1. James Brown I Can't Stand It "76" (Polydor, 1974)
  2. A Certain Ratio Shack Up (Factory, 1980)
  3. Barry Waite & Ltd. Sting (Part 1) (Leo, 1974)
  4. Jermaine Jackson Erucu (Natural Resources, 1977)
  5. Talking Heads I Zimbra (Sire, 1979)
  6. Grandmaster Caz & Chris Stein South Bronx Subway Rap (Animal, 1983)
  7. Brian Eno/DavidByrne Regiment (Sire, 1981)
  8. 400 Blows Declaration Of Intent (Illuminated, 1984)
  9. Hashim Primrose Path (Cutting, 1986)
  10. New Order Confusion (Substance Version) (Factory, 1983)
  11. Man Parrish Hip Hop, Be Bop (Don't Stop) (Special Disconet Remix) (Ram's Horn, 1983)
  12. Grandmaster Flash & The Furious Five New York New York (Sugar Hill, 1983)
  13. Tony Allen with Afrobeat 2000 When One Road Close (Another One Go Open) (Wrasse, 1984)
  14. Talking Heads Born Under Punches (The Heat Goes On) (Sire, 1980)
  15. Spoonie Gee Spoonin' Rap (I Don't Drink Smoke Or Gamble Neither I'm The Cold Crushing Lover) (Sound Of New York, 1979)
  16. Brian Eno/DavidByrne Moonlight In Glory (Sire, 1981)
  17. David Bowie The Secret Life Of Arabia (RCA Victor, 1977)
  18. Can Sunday Jam (Harvest, 1979)
  19. Talking Heads Listening Wind (Sire, 1980)
  20. Brian Eno Energy Fools The Magician (Island, 1977)

Only Happy When It Rains

A mix for a today. A brief history of the world. Originally conceived as a simple Spotify playlist, so the transitions are a bit abrupt here and there, a tad rough (like, who cares?) This is a case where it's about the story the songs tell. Soul-baring comments may be forthcoming... then again, maybe not. For the moment, I let the music speak for itself.

  1. Rowland S. Howard Dead Radio (Reliant)
  2. Kate Bush How To Be Invisible (EMI)
  3. Duran Duran Save A Prayer (EMI)
  4. Patti Smith Group Dancing Barefoot (Arista)
  5. Love And Rockets So Alive (Beggars Banquet)
  6. David Bowie Blackout (RCA Victor)
  7. Editors Munich (Kitchenware)
  8. Blank Dogs Setting Fire To Your House (In The Red)
  9. Ric Ocasek Jimmy Jimmy (Geffen)
  10. Bat For Lashes Daniel (Parlophone)
  11. The Cure Lullaby (Fiction)
  12. Doves M62 Song (Heavenly)
  13. Echo & The Bunnymen The Killing Moon (Korova)
  14. The Rolling Stones Heaven (Rolling Stones)
  15. Lee Hazlewood & Nancy Sinatra Some Velvet Morning (Reprise)
  16. The Velvet Underground Sunday Morning (MGM)
  17. Young Marble Giants Brand - New - Life (Rough Trade)
  18. Lush Hypocrite (4AD)
  19. The Afghan Whigs Algiers (Sub Pop)
  20. The Jesus And Mary Chain Happy When It Rains (Blanco Y Negro)

Note: There is a sequel for this mix (in the works).

How’s Your Evening So Far?

Halloween. A day with a lot of memories through the years, but when it comes to music I think back to one in particular. It was about fifteen years ago. Futureform had recently parted ways near the end of summer, with Snakes doing his high desert thang with the Blinka project, while I'd been making moves with Shadez Of Colour. In the lab, crossing the machine soul of Timbaland and The Neptunes with the hi-tech funk of Underground Resistance. Putting together the Allied Heights mix and the New Reality EP (which was about to be pressed up at NSC).

This the era when Groovetech was still in full swing and you could catch live sets from the likes of Suburban Knight and Ian O'Brien via real video recorded at their premises, along with tons of footage from the DEMF (including Kenny Dixon Jr.'s amazing set - featuring an appearance by Umar Bin Hassan of The Last Poets on the mic - and Kenny Larkin's mind-blowing blues-inflected live performance). I'd been checking Kirk Degiorgio's Op-Art Hall Of Fame and keying into loads of great records from the past - things like Herbie Hancock's Headhunters material and Sun Ra's Lanquidity - augmenting the Curtis Mayfield, Parliament and Sly Stone records that I'd already had in constant rotation at the time. All of this of course lined up perfectly with the shades of computer soul that I'd been soaking up all the while, from the likes of Carl Craig's Innerzone Orchestra and 4 Hero's astral breakbeat jazz to those amazing Recloose EPs and even Drexciya's stark machine funk.

All of which sets the scene for this particular Halloween back in 2002. Two records happened to arrive by mail that day: Mtume's Juicy Fruit and Lil' Louis' French Kiss. These two tracks had a huge impact on me (and both of them were considerable hits in their day), the former a sparkling slab of atmospheric modern soul while the the latter was a trance dance masterpiece (and a key record in house music's development). I'd only had the both of them on different compilations up until that point, but a new job meant that I finally had the money to track them down on wax. I sometimes wonder if this was the very moment that crystallized the concept of machine soul in my mind? I was in my room giving them a spin on my Gemini XL-500 II's - possibly even recording them to MP3 in the process - and soaking up their deep, nocturnal sounds (this back when the time change would occur before Halloween, rather than after... so it would have already grown dark outside) just before taking my cousins out in the neighborhood for a night of trick-or-treating.

Lil' Louis - French Kiss (Remixes)

(Epic: 1989)

This is the version of French Kiss that I had back then, a reissue with four mixes included along with The Original Underground Mix. I've always had a soft spot for the Talkin' All That Jazz Mix, but the original is undoubtedly the one you want. People often point to its motorik bass figure as a key moment in the birth of trance, but really everything about it is spectacular: that recurring chrome brassy figure, those rolling bleep loops, the TR-707 drum fills, the moaning lady during its protracted climax - where the track slows down to a halt before building up again - it all comes together in a shimmering vision of dancefloor psychedelia. Like Juan Atkins' Model 500 material - records like Night Drive (Thru-Babylon) and The Flow - it's one of those key moments at the nexus of tronix and soul that seem to act as a catalyst, opening the door to previously undisclosed possibilities.

Mtume - Juicy Fruit

(Epic: 1983)

The other record was the original 12" release of Juicy Fruit, which paired the vocal version - a sensuously surreal computer blue reverie, with one of the great synth progressions during its chorus - with an extended instrumental. It actually turned out to be slightly different from what I was looking for. The "Fruity" Instrumental Mix, as it's called, is lengthened to seven minutes and still features a fair amount of vocals over a stripped down backing track. It's a satisfying trip in its own right, no question, but the version I was looking for was even stranger.

Mtume - Juicy Fruit

(Epic: 1983)

Slightly later, I snapped up the LP, which - against all odds - had what I was looking for. I was absolutely sure that the version I was looking for could have only come from the b-side of a different 12" - so singularly strange was its trancelike shades of ambient soul - but it turned out to tucked away at the end of the album as a sort of reprise. The After 6 Mix (Juicy Fruit Part II) is an ethereal glide through liquid neon in the darkness, revelling in the lush textures of the original version while James Mtume and Tawatha Agee trade loose, off-the-cuff vocals and asides. In the seventies, James Mtume had played percussion with various jazz ensembles - including Miles Davis' (including the awesome Get Up With It) before recording deep astral jazz records like Rebirth Cycle and Alkebu-Lan: Land Of The Blacks. You can certainly hear that heady attention to texture here, as his crew (including other seventies jazz figures like fellow Miles alumni Reggie Lucas and Hubert Eaves - the man behind the deep seventies Esoteric Funk LP) get down to business within the context of eighties dancefloor boogie.

Lil' Louis - French Kiss

(: Diamond)

Lil' Louis was a Chicago original, operating his Future club night in parallel to Frankie Knuckles' endeavors at The Warehouse. He cut a singular path through the eighties house scene, with records like Frequency and The Original Video Clash (backed with How I Feel and Music Takes U Away, respectively) before dropping the French Kiss EP. This is the original release for French Kiss, which features the acid house shapes of Jupiter, New York's minimal groove and the hard-edged, almost-punk moves of War Games, and which I didn't get ahold of until some time later.

Lil' Louis & The World - From The Mind Of Lil' Louis

(Epic: 1989)

This, on the other hand, I did already have. The full-length statement that Louis released in the wake of French Kiss' runaway success in the UK, it includes an updated version of French Kiss with vocals from Karlana Johnson and an edit of Wargames. Hearing it for the first time was one of those great, unconfigurable listening experiences, and it remains one of the most fully realized house LPs even as it transcends that genre tag. The album opens with the contemporary single I Called U, which finds Louis dealing with the droning advances of a female stalker over a piano-led backdrop, before moving into the angular, trancelike shapes of Blackout. Deep house missives Tuch Me and 6 A.M. feature collaborations with the original deep house architect Larry Heard), while the rolling minimal groove of It's The Only Thing finds him working with Chicago industrialists Die Warzau. Ever the consummate sensitive artiste, Louis gets introspective with the ethereal Insecure and enters slow jam territory with The Love You Wanted, while Brittany is a two-and-a-half ambient piano sonata. The album-closing Lil Tanya is a low slung blues workout featuring his father Bobby Sims on guitar and lead vocal. A few years later, Louis released the follow up album Journey With The Lonely, a more organic-sounding record that often gets mentioned among the great house long-players of all time.

The two of them taken together certainly suggests something incredibly special...

Ambient soul/house music/trance dance/eighties boogie.

Machine Soul (Part 1)...

Have a happy Halloween.