RE: Room, Parallax (An Update)

Man in a denim Parallax jacket stands in front of circuitry and Gene Hackman listens in
room_parallax

PARALLAX_ROOM/BUILD IN PROGRESS... EXECUTE BISON SRC CTRL {PARAMETERS NEFKT: DAT, ZONE INTSCT, BNE, NEXUS} ... PICKOUT// ԫ ¥ ^ ϯ ỷ ᵺ ÷ ⱸ ϼ £ ᵺ ᵺ £ ϼ Φ ᴟ ʮ ¾ ȶ ʥ ☼ њ ʂ ῼ ψ » ª Ϫ ʥ ► ʮ ἆ ¡ ʂ ᴥ & њњ☼ǥ & ₻»?☼ӝȶ & ѽ & ₯ m ᴔ ₰ ᵺ ᴔ # ᴟ ᴟ њ ῼ ἆ ỷ ₰ ⱷ ؆ ᴁ # ► ₡ ► ► ⱷ њ Ҿ ? Ψ Ҿ ≈ ῼ ₡ M Φ ʂ ª » Ϗ ʂ ª Ø ѽ ͯ ỷ ☼ ש Ϗ ⱸ Φ ₡ Ω Ψ @ ¥ Ϫ ¥ ͯ ᵺ ʱ Ҿ ¾ ѽ M Җ ⱸ ᴁ ÷ ? ϯ ϼ ₡ ʮ ʱ @ ҙ ҙ Ҿ Ϗ ? ≈ ψ M ᴥ ≈ ǥ % & ę ȶ ᵺ ﭏ ӝ ӝ ᴥ Ø m » ʂ Ϗ ؆ ᵹ ﭏ ‡ Ψ & ª Ψ ǥ M ϣ ỷ ʱ ¾ ☼ » ¾ ᴔ ᵹ ₯ £ ﭏ ᴁ Ω Җ ϣ ᶼ ʮ ὖ ӝ ǥ ȶ ỷ Ϫ % Ϫ ȶ $ ϯ ש ₯ ᵺ Ҿ Ω ₡ ¥ ͯ ę ᶼ Ϫ ʂ ϼ ¥ £ ҙ ? ʱ $ ► # ỷ ‡ ӝ ϼ ӝ ► Ø ᴥ ≈ % ⱸ ᶼ ╣ ʥ ῼ ? ≈ ► ₰ & % Ϫ Ø ȶ ‡ ὖ ﭏ ⱸ ϣ ͯ ► M Ϗ ԫ Ω ¡ ؆ M ᴁ ϼ & m # ϼ £ ^ // Something Happened On Dollis Hill ...SERC... ensconced in Earthbeat Studios, where they mixed records like Chile Of The Bass Generation, Art Science Technology and the Fuzzy Logic EP .....SERC... science of the breakbeat, 4 Hero eclipsed the entirety of ...SERC... Grand Central Station ...SERC... Radio Clash/Video Clash ...SERC... How's your evening so far? ...SERC... The Sabres Of Paradise, Andrew Weatherall linked up with ...SERC... Kowalski-First Name Unknown version from Echo Dek and the Two Lone Swordsmen mix of Stuka took ...SERC... ##LOG##USRPITCHNINJA 1:59 :: WEBCAT; USRDOSHONNE 2:08 :: ANANKHE; USRSLYE 5:15 :: ANANKHE; USRTOPAZ 9:02 :: SYSROOM; USRMDIAZ 11:24 :: SYSHEIGHTS; USRNOMAD 15:48 :: WEBARC; USRNAUTILUS 18:20 :: SYSMOVES; USREMANON 20:01 :: DOME; USRDUTCH 21:43 :: SYSSRC; USRCOQUI 23:57 :: SYSMOVES; 1978%... PICKOUT// Ϫ ש ψ ₻ ⱸ ỷ Ψ ◊ ʂ ^ ¾ ᴁ ψ ỷ & @ @ £ њ ⱸ ϼ Ҿ ᴟ ʱ ⱷ ⱷ ᴥ ᴁ 3 » ᵺ Ϫ ʮ ⱸ ᵹ ¥ » ǥ ¥ ₰ ʮ ► Ω Ω ҙ ʱ ψ ǥ ¾ % Ψ ᵺ ϣ Ϗ ¥ ὖ ⱸ ῼ ᴟ & ϼ ὖ ש ԫ ≈ ᴥ Ҿ Ψ ԫ ₡ ᴟ ȶ ʱ Ϫ ῼ ᴔ ► ► ʮ ₯ ‡ ԫ $ ϼ ӝ ᵹ ę ӝ ʱ ȶ ₰ % Φ M Φ % & ʮ ӝ ¡ ¾ њ њ ᵺ £ ϣ ÷ ¡ ⱷ ҙ ʥ ^ Җ ῼ ‡ ^ Җ ₻ ≈ ª ᶼ ϣ ╣ ⱸ ʂ ? ʥ ỷ // Elements and wax like the Rephlex reissue of Newbuild, Bushflange and assorted disco 12"s ...SERC... Futureform Live @ Club Xanth [2002] and the vector ...SERC... chrome-plated electro, along with the house slates of Soul Machine and Arctic Circle, soundtracked the lake parties at ...SERC... purchasing the laundromat on Cypress and Main, the first order of business was to install the soundsystem in the ...SERC... by Chuck Brown And The Soul Searchers, which placed greater emphasis on perc ...SERC... The Bridge Is Over ...SERC... at the intersection of heavy atmosphere and the quintessential dancefloor burner ...SERC... The Hollywood Recordings...SRC...Curtis/Live at The Bitter End...SERC...funk bleeds into electro["0@0.,#ISLEY$%@] ...SERC... (Short Edit) GRADE -> PEARL -> LP1998... PARALLAX_ROOM/DATABASE POPULATE... PEACE. ARMAGEDDON HAD BEEN IN EFFECT, GO GET A LATE PASS. STEP! THIS TIME AROUND, THE REVOLUTION WILL NOT BE TELEVISED. STEP! CONSIDER YOURSELVES... WARNED!... PICKOUT// ϼ ϣ Җ Ϫ ԫ ^ ¥ ᵺ Ҿ £ ϣ ª ǥ ἆ ? Ϗ ѽ $ њ ᴁ Ω ₡ ᴔ њ ỷ ỷ ﭏ ¥ ? ‡ & ☼ ╣ Ϗ ᵺ Ψ ỷ ؆ ἆ & ͯ ÷ Ψ ἆ ȶ £ ψ ► ǥ Ø % ª & ᴁ ę m ᵺ # M ≈ ԫ Ҿ ► ¥ M ӝ Ϫ ῼ ȶ ѽ ؆ & & ¾ ≈ ᴟ ► Φ ʂ ► % % ᶼ ỷ & ש ὖ ͯ ӝ ¥ » # ψ ᴔ ʥ ʱ ₡ ÷ Ҿ Ϫ ► # ỷ ϼ ӝ ʱ ᴟ M ª ᴁ ͯ ► ӝ ʮ Ҿ ῼ Ω ᴔ ʂ ʮ ỷ ȶ ῼ ϼ ? ? ʮ ¥ //Computerised Dub.circuit... Reload (A Collection Of Short Stories)

RAG017: Summer 2015

Radio AG Episode 017

Winter 2015

Coming at you in the last possible moment... here's a mix for the end of summer! Smack in the middle of a heatwave, you wouldn't know it to look outside. Sometimes, you've gotta heat it up in order to cool it back down.

Listen Now

  1. The Parallax Sound Lab Radio AG Intro
  2. Welcome to the madness...

  3. Black Grape Little Bob Radioactive
  4. Shaun Ryder's post-Happy Mondays project finds him in league with one-half of the Ruthless Rap Assassins, just in time to bridge the gap between Madchester and the dusted big beat excursions just around the bend. This is the closing track to It's Great When You're Straight ...Yeah, a record I'd almost forgot about until very recently. It's even better than I remembered, and ended up being my soundtrack to this past summer.

  5. Major Force Productions Sax Hoodlum Major Force
  6. A massive slab of breakbeat noise from this Japanese crew. Major Force were at the cutting edge of sampladelic hip hop, operating in parallel to figures like Bomb The Bass and The 45 King. This record came out a bit later, but still arrived in time for its fat, feedback-drenched basslines to predict The Chemical Brothers in Block Rockin' Beats mode. Mo Wax, in one of their periodic coups back in the nineties, put out an essential box set covering a wide swathe of Major Force's stellar output. It's still surprisingly findable, so don't hesitate!

  7. Odd Squad Jazz Rendition Rap-A-Lot
  8. Absolutely scorching moves from this Texas crew (featuring the inimitable Devin The Dude), flowing ruff, rugged and raw over a hype breakbeat and jazz shapes in fast-forward. I always did like a good uptempo rap, and this is about as good as it gets. The group's sole full-length, Fadanuf Fa Erybody, is a masterpiece of jazz-soaked Southern hip hop.

  9. Lightnin' Rod Jimi Hendrix Doriella Du Fontaine Celluloid
  10. Jimi Hendrix and Buddy Miles jamming with Lightnin' Rod (Jalal Nuriddin of The Last Poets) back in 1969. As far as I know, it didn't see the light of day until 1984 when Celluloid issued it as a 12". You can see the basis for Hustlers Convention in not only its absorbing tale but that unstoppable, ever-building groove.

  11. Massive Attack Horace Andy Light My Fire Live Wild Bunch
  12. I actually heard this version before I got to hear the The Doors' original. It totally spun me around at the time, stripped down as it was and yet at the same time teeming with those half-lit rootsical vibes. That's Bristol for you. Daddy G hypes the crowd while Horace Andy does his inimitable thing over rugged breakbeats, video game bleeps emerging scattershot from the mix. When the horn solo hits, I'm 15 again.

  13. Kendrick Lamar King Kunta Top Dawg
  14. To Pimp A Butterfly is a truly staggering album, housing a breadth of vision that is only surpassed by its depth of feeling. Hear it a dozen times and you've still only scratched the surface. I have a feature kicking around somewhere that places it squarely in the continuum stretching from Electric Ladyland to America Eats Its Young and beyond. I'll need to dig that up sometime. King Kunta plays like a call to arms, its momentum a chain reaction that builds and builds as Lamar's relentless flow culminates in a glorious will to power. You could write a whole book on this LP.

  15. The Orb Toxygene Island
  16. Toxygene apparently began life as a remix for Jean Michel-Jarre's Oxygene 7-13, but was ultimately rejected by Jarre and wound up on The Orb's Orblivion. Its blunted 4/4 dub stylings seem to draw on the sound of earlier classics like Perpetual Dawn and Blue Room, even as it threatens to surpass them in its carnivalesque grandeur and that casually monolithic stomp.

  17. Keni Stevens Night Moves Ultra-Sensual Mix Elite
  18. Ever since seeing Night Moves (with Gene Hackman), I've made it a mission to check out any song of the same title (even if Dee Dee Bridgewater's version, as heard in the Spring Mix, was already comfortably in the stacks by that time). I can't explain it, it's just one of my thangs.

    At any rate, I chanced into hearing this one and then managed to find it for next to nothing shortly after. It's quite simply one of the great atmospheric soul records of its era, up there with Mtume's Juicy Fruit and The Isley Brothers' Between The Sheets. The Ultra-Sensual Mix reshapes the original rhythm into a form not unlike Flynn's light cycle, grooving light years smoother as if over the grid itself. Beyond that, it's pure atmosphere... reverb-draped vocals echo out into the distance while neon blue vectors scroll beneath a vast twilight landscape, crescent moon shimmering in the night sky.

  19. Dâm-Funk We Continue Stones Throw
  20. I was lucky enough to catch Dâm-Funk at The Casbah a few weeks ago in what turned out to be a sold out show. It happened to be the same day his new album came out, so I snapped up a copy with the quickness. It finds the man emerging from behind his synths and taking the mantle of frontman, plying a sort of Ready For The World-esque electric funk. I've always loved the way he seems to split the difference between r&b and techno, and this finds him continuing in that mode. True machine soul.

  21. Vangelis Let It Happen Vertigo
  22. Liquid, soothing kosmische folk from the man behind Blade Runner Blues. Crystalline Fender Rhodes dance across drifting currents of Mellotron in an utterly absorbing swirl of cosmic psychedelia. Pure, glistening dreamtime music. This is one of those songs that everyone should get to hear at least once.

  23. Johnny Hammond Shifting Gears Milestone
  24. From the album Gears, one of the all-time greatest jazz funk records, sporting what may be the very best Mizell Brothers production of them all. Perfect soundscape after perfect soundscape. Keys in liquid Rhodes cascade over rubberband basslines and crisp drum breaks; chants echo and repeat, existing as pure texture throughout. Another Green World music.

  25. MC Kelz Lynx Clash Of The Beats Three Stripe
  26. A Smith & Mighty beat for MC Kelz on their own Three Stripe imprint. If you're at all familiar with the duo's records then you know Kelz from later tunes like Seeds and the DJ-Kicks/I Don't Know remix. With Smith & Mighty, you can almost always count on those great three-dimensional beats cutting jagged through the mix, raw and with a true physical heft to them. This track later figured into The Three Stripe Collection, an unmissable mop up of classics from the label's short-lived run.

  27. Marvin Gaye Anger Tamla
  28. Perfection. I generally think of this as a rainy day record, but then I play it in the dead of summer and its gentle ARPs sound sun-glazed and the trees seem to sway with its beat in the sunset. It's that Gaussian-blurred blunted quality that draws you in, and the nonchalant inevitability of that descending bridge that keeps your ears reaching out, as if grasping for the horizon.

  29. Barış Manço Baykoca Destani iii. Kara Haber - Turnanin Ölümü Yavuz Plak
  30. From the epic suite that takes up most of the second side of his 2023, these flutes draw that beat out into the abyss.

  31. Max 404 Steinfeld, Summer. 1982 Eevo Lute
  32. Conversely, this is most likely a rainy day record even as I often peg it as a summer one. I remember finding it at the El Cajon Music Trader in the dead of August way back in the day. Here's a record that I wasn't expecting to ever get to hear, just sitting in the racks for a couple dollars! That shop was such a great font of electronic music almost in spite of itself (I need to write about this sometime). To this day, I can't imagine who was selling this stuff back used... but I'll always be grateful for the opportunity to have scooped it up at such an early stage in the game.

  33. Eddie Russ Salem Avenue Monument
  34. This one was a Kirk Degiorgio tip-off, from his Op-ART Hall Of Fame breakout of classic jazz and soul records. Another sterling jazz funk record, this time poised at the precipice of the disco age. Recorded at United Sound Studios, where George Clinton laid down his slew of classics around the same time, this is crammed with synths that seem to spring from the earth itself. The sleeve perfectly capturing the sun-kissed sounds contained within. Salem Avenue itself is exquisitely lush and deep-glazed in the heat of late summer. You can practically feel the steam rising from the asphalt.

  35. Erykah Badu That Hump Universal Motown
  36. From New Amerykah: Part One 4th World War, a record that has gone on to have lasting repercussions in the intervening years. I see the spirit of Black Messiah and To Pimp A Butterfly prefigured in this record's deeply furrowed grooves. The spectre of J Dilla looms large over the proceedings, while SA-RA were behind the mixing desk for large stretches and seemed to have had a huge hand in shaping the record's spaced-out, machine soul sound.

  37. E.S.G. Anticipation Perrion
  38. Quintessential low slung Texas hip hop, crafted by this central member of DJ Screw's clique. A heartbreaking record that happens to feature a gorgeous sun-kissed beat that rides a sizable portion of The Bar-Kays' song of the same title, rolling in languid slow-motion.

  39. SA-RA Creative Partners Hollywood Redux Babygrande
  40. As good a tune as any to illustrate the sort of music that I like. SA-RA were important to me because they seemed to make explicit the line stretching from machine soul like Mtume and Kleeer forward in time to Model 500 and Carl Craig into Timbaland and The Neptunes, a line that gradually became apparent to me around the turn of the century. Like Dâm-Funk, SA-RA seem to split the difference between r&b and techno, coming at it from a deeply spaced out, prog-inflected angle. Hollywood Redux itself sounds like nothing so much as Supa Dupa Fly beamed into Deep Space in search of an Intimate Connection.

  41. Reload The Enlightenment Infonet
  42. Another chance encounter in the used racks, this time on the second floor of the Wherehouse across the street from Grossmont Center (do I ever miss that place!). I was pleasantly surprised to see this record feature in Fact Magazine's The 100 Best Albums Of The Nineties1 recently. This record was something like Global Communication's unofficial debut, wherein savage industrial passages alternate with some of the most gorgeous ambient you could imagine (hinting at the inspired, schizophrenic path the duo would blaze throughout the rest of the decade).

Radio AG Black Grape - It's Great When You're Straight... Yeah Major Force Productions - Grass Roots Dub Odd Squad - Fadanuf Fa Erybody Lightnin' Rod with Jimi Hendrix - Doriella Du Fontaine Massive Attack - Protection
Kendrick Lamar - To Pimp A Butterfly The Orb - Orblivion Keni Stevens - Night Moves (Ultra-Sensual Mix) Dâm-Funk - Invite The Light Vangelis - Earth Johnny Hammond - Gears
MC Kelz - Clash Of The Beats Marvin Gaye - Here, My Dear Barış Manço - 2023 Max 404 - Love & Mathematics Eddie Russ - See The Light Erykah Badu - New Amerykah: Part One (4th World War)
E.S.G. - Ocean Of Funk SA-RA Creative Partners - The Hollywood Recordings Reload - A Collection Of Short Stories
RAG017: The Records

Credits

Edits: Do'shonne and Slye.

Time stretching: Do'shonne and Nautilus Jones.

Vibes: Atari 2600, Kleeer, Lake Murray, Jazz Mosaic, Sittin' On Chrome.

Footnotes

1.

Sande, Kiran, Tom Lea, Joseph Morpurgo, Angus Finlayson, Mr. Beatnick, Tim Purdom, Robin Jahdi and Tam Gunn. The 100 Best Albums of the 1990s. FACT. The Vinyl Factory, 3 Sep. 2012. http://www.factmag.com/2012/09/03/the-100-best-albums-of-the-1990s-100-81/. Accessed 22 Sep. 2015.

RAG016: Spring 2015

Radio AG Episode 016

Spring 2015

I almost missed the window to do a Spring mix this year, but ultimately ended up putting something together at the last moment (rather than miss the season entirely). Against all odds, this one practically mixed itself. It should be noted right out the gate that this mix leans fairly heavily on the late nineties, particularly 1997 and the first half of 1998, for reasons that I will expand on someday. Suffice it to say that rather than a walk down memory lane, the music here strikes me as locked onto the very pulse of today. Since this mix is coming out late into Spring, the mood is a bit more dusted, more sun-baked than it otherwise might have been. So just take this as a soundtrack to the last weeks of Spring, as Summer rapidly approaches...

Listen Now

  1. The Parallax Sound Lab Radio AG Intro
  2. The standard introductions in place.

  3. Scott Weiland Jimmy Was A Stimulator Atlantic
  4. Kicking off with a forgotten slab of noise from Scott Weiland's solo debut, this is in essence a Nuggets track in all but name: raw garage punk implementing the technology of the era — in this case 808 beats and filtered techno bass — delivering a three minute bolt from the blue. Should have been a single.

  5. Arabian Prince Strange Life Rapsur
  6. Mid-eighties electro. The production on this is perfect! I hinted at the man's underground pedigree here, dating back to well before he'd hooked up with N.W.A.. This record finds him transcribing the vibes of L.A.'s party scene — the house parties, nightclubs and roller rinks — to wax. There was an excellent interview with Arabian Prince and The Egyptian Lover in Wax Poetics1 a few years back that happened to coincide with a superb retrospective of the man's work that came out on Stones Throw.

  7. Little Computer People Little Computer People Psi49net
  8. Late-nineties electro. Like I-f's Space Invaders Are Smoking Grass, this split the difference between electro and eighties synth pop, predicting the whole electroclash movement years before the media blitz descended. Little Computer People is an obsessive slice of computer disco that could have burned up the charts in any decade, while the video remains one of the great undiscovered promo clips. Check it out!2

  9. Fluke Absurd Mighty Dub Katz Vox Astralwerks
  10. Norman Cook takes a break from his Fatboy Slim alias to turn in this ace remix of a quasi-industrial Fluke track (from their excellent Risotto LP), filtering the original through a Planet Rock prism and winding up with one of the great electro tracks of the day. For my money, this is the definitive version of Absurd, boasting a massive climax not even present in the original version. Possibly Cook's greatest moment (give or take Everybody Needs A 303).

  11. Masta Killa RZA & U-God Digi Warfare Nature Sounds
  12. Yet another space jam in disguise, this time from the Wu-Tang Clan's Masta Killa. Seeming to offer up a loose breakbeat take on the World Class Wreckin' Cru's Surgery, this record teems with richly demented strings weaving through the ether as four-dimensional breakbeats work out their logic beneath. I've always loved traxx like this that hang in there around 110 BPM — that interzone between house and hip hop — plying a deep digital funk existing in a fertile, under-explored territory that remains ripe with possibilities.

  13. Tony! Toni! Toné! Tonyies! In The Wrong Key Motown
  14. This is a strange one, buried deep within Tony! Toni! Toné! third record Sons Of Soul (the There's A Riot Goin' On of new jack swing). From within a sumptuously multi-textured soundscape, Raphael Saadiq sort of half-sings his way through the verses while the rest of the group drops in periodically for the nagging refrain. Tumbling breakbeats — a hallmark of this LP — shuffle beneath it all as dial tone punctuates the endless, rolling rhythm and occasional snatches of blues guitar flicker in the shadows.

  15. Murky Waters Check Yourself Pranna Mix Main Squeeze
  16. The original has always reminded me of Songs In The Key Of Life-era Stevie Wonder, but this dark remix on the flip warps the vocals into oblivion over an eerie slice of electronic jazz that seems to soundtrack some bizarre nexus between daydream and nightmare. The turn of the century was a great time for this sort of thing, culminating in a warped permutation of the neo soul sound that would continue to throw shapes across the ensuing decade.

  17. Blue Öyster Cult Screams Columbia
  18. Gothic biker rock from this thoroughly conceptual band-in-a-box. This from their self-titled debut, an utterly essential hard rock record. The unique thing about the early Blue Öyster Cult is that they come on like a Nuggets-era garage punk group that's stumbled upon heavy metal, maintaining the same sense of raw, unstable propulsion that one expects from The Seeds or the 13th Floor Elevators even as the darkness comes creeping in. When that slow motion chorus hits its like plunging deep into the Black Sea.

  19. Viernes 13 Piérdete Chica Viernes 13
  20. Only recently discovered this crew when they opened for The English Beat last month, where I was totally floored by their live show. I've been rocking both their records ever since, tending to prefer the dust and grime of their debut's sun-baked boleros to the new record's pristine polish, capturing as it does the idiosyncratic brilliance of the band's live show.

  21. Family Of Intelligence Vernon Smith The Fruit Kemet
  22. From the undeniably awesome Champion Jungle Sound double-LP on Kemet. If you want to get at the essence of jungle — its very DNA distilled in the purest form — then this should be your first port of call. I dropped this back to back with the previous record in the spirit of those old Recent Abduction shows where I'd occasionally operate the soundsystem for the band, spinning a mix of jungle and dub between set after set of local punk rock.

  23. Dr. Alimantado Ride On Greensleeves
  24. One of the great deejay LPs — indeed one of the great reggae LPs period — this features Dr. Alimantado toasting mad science over rock hard backing tracks, his singular personality towering over a smeared, sun-glazed psychedelia that stretches for miles. Everybody needs a copy of this record.

  25. The Herbaliser Put It On Tape Ninja Tune
  26. Circa late 1998 — in a moment of existential frustration — I remember saying to Snakes I just want to play trip hop in bars, which became something of a running joke at the time. This one of those records that makes me think of that era. Not a great LP, but it does feature the presence of a then-unknown Jean Grae — trading under the name What? What? at the time — in one of her earliest appearances on wax, plus a couple of instrumentals that have remained with me ever since.

  27. George Duke Peace MPS
  28. This and the next tune were made for each other. Those gently cascading Rhodes wash over everything. Such beauty! George Duke imbued everything he did with a generosity of spirit that really does shine through in the grooves. I was saddened to hear of the man's passing a couple years back.

  29. Cheo Feliciano Mi Triste Problema Vaya
  30. Salsa luminary's belated solo debut after over a decade in the game, providing vocals for the likes of Eddie Palmieri and Joe Cuba's bands. After a rough patch that found the man in the throes of heroin addiction, he quits cold turkey and cleans up for good, getting it together in the studio with songwriter-auteur Tite Curet Alonso and an ace backing band including Johnny Pacheco, Bobby Valentin and Justo Betancourt, crafting these gently rolling, velvet soundscapes in the process. It's hard not to picture the sleepy seaside of Ponce — those gently rolling hills rising in the distance — on hearing these gently aching grooves.

  31. Dee Dee Bridgewater Night Moves Elektra
  32. Now this one I can't even begin to explain. Soul jazz chanteuse Dee Dee Bridgewater covers the theme tune from Arthur Penn's Night Moves — starring Gene Hackman — resulting in this breathy dreamtime confection, all shuffling breezy rhythms and liquid Rhodes. Did the original even have lyrics? From Just Family, the first of her stellar three album run on Elektra, which found Bridgewater navigating the disco era with finesse. It's almost surprising that this tune isn't more widely known.

  33. Tricky Brand New You're Retro 4th & Broadway
  34. From the trip hop visionary's epochal debut. I've gone digital about this one before, and no doubt will again and again, as it is without a doubt one of my favorite albums ever. I never tire of this track's rush of adrenaline smack in the middle of such strung-out surroundings. It is, along with the Public Enemy cover, the sound of fury on wax. It's a shame that the rough edges of trip hop were beveled away with such haste. Many of the genre's wilder numbers remain among its very best.

  35. Can Half Past One Harvest
  36. Late-period Can gets short shrift, but if they'd been an entirely different band no one had ever heard of — without those legendary early records hanging over them — I'd reckon people would be blown away by what they heard. Everything from Landed onward compares quite favorably with Remain In Light-era Talking Heads, and stands on its own as a sort of shimmering fourth world psychedelia.

  37. Millsart Dr. Ice Axis
  38. Turn of the century Jeff Mills in Detroit classicist mode, which might make the skeptics snicker. Whatever. The man had put in so much time living in the 23rd century, who could fault him for taking some downtime to his machines sing like The Temptations? Here he conjures up the same sort of lush techno you'd find on the space jazz records he did with UR, records like Nation 2 Nation and Jupiter Jazz, deftly imbuing everything with the same sharp-tooled precision as his Purpose Maker material. The sound of casual utopia.

  39. Neneh Cherry Buddy X Inspired by......!?! Circa
  40. Do people consider Neneh Cherry to be trip hop? I've always heard her as a contemporary of Soul II Soul and Smith & Mighty, a fellow traveler operating in the same sonic space. Innovators all, in other words. This incredible tune is so functionally tight — yet at the same time spiritually loose — that it seems almost improvised, even in the face of those furiously programmed whiplash beats and Neneh's righteously eloquent message.

  41. Smith & Mighty Alice Perera I Don't Know 12" Mix 1 Studio !K7
  42. Speaking of Smith & Mighty, this slice of paradise in its purest form is without a doubt the crew's peak (although I tend to love everything they touch). Shimmering roots 'n future in a deep way, this of-the-moment machine soul could have been huge given the right set of circumstances.

  43. Them It's All Over Now, Baby Blue Deram
  44. From the second LP by this storied rock 'n roll crew, this finds them stretching out into folkier territory than ever before (prefiguring Van Morrison's later direction). Here, his breathtaking croon pushes the tune onto a deeply spiritual plane. Perhaps everyone knows this as the basis for Beck's epochal Jack-Ass, but this truly stellar take on the Bob Dylan standard should be more widely heard.

  45. The Crooklyn Dodgers Crooklyn MCA
  46. New York hip hop in excelsis, this features peak period production from Q-Tip while Masta Ace, Buckshot (of Black Moon) and Special Ed trade verses about the seventies (the days when kids didn't act so crazy). From the Spike Lee joint of the same name, this perfectly captures the same sense of gentle nostalgia felt throughout that film. Humorously, even as they're all reminiscing on the seventies, it makes me nostalgic for the nineties of my youth!

  47. Stone Temple Pilots Seven Caged Tigers Atlantic
  48. Bringing it all back home. Scott Weiland, yet again. This from the Stone Temple Pilots' Tiny Music... Songs From The Vatican Gift Shop, which found the band teasing out the edges of their muscular hard rock with gentle psychedelic flourishes, the odd touch of lounge and even jazz funk (but only for a moment!). I've always thought this tune had a deeply reflective, almost zen cadence to it, like a man coming to terms with his place in the world, the very sound seeming to radiate a sense of supreme inner peace...

Radio AG Testcard Scott Weiland - 12 Bar Blues Arabian Prince - Strange Life Little Computer People - Electro Pop Fluke - Absurd Masta Killa - No Said Date
Tony! Toni! Toné! - Sons Of Soul Murky Waters - Check Yourself Blue Öyster Cult - Blue Öyster Cult Viernes 13 - Just Move! Kemet Crew - Champion Jungle Sound Dr. Alimantado - Best Dressed Chicken In Town
The Herbaliser - Blow Your Headphones George Duke - The Inner Source Cheo Feliciano - Cheo Dee Dee Bridgewater - Just Family Tricky - Maxinquaye Can - Landed
Millsart - Every Dog Has Its Day Neneh Cherry - Homebrew Smith & Mighty - DJ-Kicks EP Them - Them Again Various Artists - Crooklyn OST The Stone Temple Pilots - Tiny Music... Songs From The Vatican Gift Shop
RAG016: The Records

Credits

Time stretching: Johnny Blount and Nautilus Jones.

Vibes: Metal Box, Trans Am, 1997.

Footnotes

1.

Fleisher, Eddie. Machine Funk. Wax Poetics, No. 32, 2008. 54-60.

2.

Little Computer People. Little Computer People. Electro Pop. Rother, Anthony. Lewandowski, Piotr J. Psi49net, 2001. Music Video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h3-BEqWX0Kc